food habits and nesting success of wood storks in Everglades National Park 1974

by John C. Ogden

Publisher: Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service : for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington

Written in English
Published: Pages: 24 Downloads: 214
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Subjects:

  • Wood stork.,
  • Everglades National Park (Fla.)

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

StatementJohn C. Ogden, James A. Kushlan, James T. Tilmant.
SeriesNatural resources report ; 16
ContributionsKushlan, James A., Tilmant, James T., United States. National Park Service.
The Physical Object
Pagination24 p. :
Number of Pages24
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17762891M

  The Wood Stork has many folk names, including Wood Ibis (due to its downcurved, ibis-like bill) and flinthead (for its scaly-looking bare head). The word "wood" probably refers to the bird's favored nesting habitat in lowland wetlands. dispersion oflong-legged wading birds in the Water Conservation Areas (WCAs)ofthe Everglades during the first six months of Briefly, the spring had abnormally high water and windy conditions throughout the season, and produced poor nesting effort, low to moderate nesting success, and low production of young. Some species, like WoodFile Size: 5MB. A Casebook on Ken Kesey's One flew over the cuckoo's nest / Published: (). Never disturb wood storks or other birds in a rookery, as they may abandon their nests. Be considerate when observing wildlife. Boats, dogs, and even people hiking nearby can disrupt wood stork courtship, nesting and feeding. Join conservation groups such as the Florida Audubon Society or The Nature Conservancy and actively participate.

Apr 3, - Explore mlighthipe's board "Wood Storks", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Stork, Wood and Birds pins. Food ecology of the Wood Stork in Florida: a study of behavioral and physiological adaptations to seasonal drought. Tesis (doctorado) The food habits and nesting success of Wood Storks in Everglades National Parks, US Natl. Park Serv. Nat. Resour. Publ. (16). The American white ibis (Eudocimus albus) is a species of bird in the ibis family, is found from Virginia via the Gulf Coast of the United States south through most of the coastal New World tropics. This particular ibis is a medium-sized bird with an overall white plumage, bright red-orange down-curved bill and long legs, and black wing tips that are Family: Threskiornithidae. wood stork nestlings up to 2 weeks of age, average per-nest- weekfoodenergy is muchcloser to white ibises (kJ nest- week −1), so area-wide food energy would typically be signif-.

The Asian openbill or Asian openbill stork (Anastomus oscitans) is a large wading bird in the stork family distinctive stork is found mainly in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. It is greyish or white with glossy black wings and tail and the adults have a gap between the arched upper mandible and recurved lower : Aves. The work is to monitor responses of breeding wading birds to hydrological conditions in the water conservation areas (WCAs) of the Everglades, and to initiate a project designed to reduce uncertainty in predicting population responses of endangered Wood Storks to restoration Storks (Mycteria americana) are of special interest with regard to the . Wood storks, roseate spoonbills, ibises and egrets are among the many birds that fly, paddle and wade through the Everglades. They draw visitors, particularly photographers, to the ecosystem. But the Everglades' birds are important for another reason: The health of wading bird communities says a lot about progress on Everglades restoration.

food habits and nesting success of wood storks in Everglades National Park 1974 by John C. Ogden Download PDF EPUB FB2

THE FOOD HABITS AND NESTING SUCCESS OF WOOD STORKS IN EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK IN INTRODUCTION This paper is a report on a study of the ecology of the Wood Stork (Mycteria wneri- cana) in Everglades National Park, conduct- ed from September to June The Wood Stork is an important link in the food.

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favorite. share. flag. Food Habits and Nesting Success of Wood Storks in Everglades National Park in by Ogden, John; Kushlan, James; Tilmant, James.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ogden, John C. Food habits and nesting success of wood storks in Everglades National Park, Washington: U.S. Govt. The food habits and nesting success of wood storks in Everglades National Park / John C.

Ogden, James A. Kushlan, James T. Tilmant. By John C Ogden AbstractAuthor: John C Ogden. The Food Habits and Nesting Success of Wood Storks in the Everglades National Park, By J.T. & Tilmant J.A. Kushlan J.C. Ogden. Abstract (Funding) This collection includes items related to Florida’s environments, ecosystems, and species.

It includes publications of the Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit project. Ogden JC, Kushlan JA, Tilmant JT. The food habits and nesting success of wood storks in Everglades National Park Washington, DC: U.S. National Park Service report no. Reference S3.

Slay C, Bryan AL Jr. Aerial surveys of wood stork nesting colonies in Florida May Author: James A. Rodgers, and William B. Brooks, Mark Barrett. The food habits and nesting success of wood storks in Everglades National Park U.S.D.I. National Park Service, National Research Repirt No.

25 pp. Declines in populations of and reproductive success of wood storks and other wading birds have occurred in the Florida Everglades over the past several decades. These declines have been concurrent with major changes in the Everglades’ landscape characteristics.

Among the plausible hypotheses that relate to landscape change are the following: (1) general Cited by: Food habits and nesting success of wood storks in Everglades National Park, (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: John C Ogden; James T Tilmant; James A Kushlan.; Gawlik, a).

Secondly, these large populations have particular aesthetic and spiritual appeal to humans. The decline of wading bird populations has been cited as a primary reason both for the creation of Everglades National Park, and for the need for a more recent compre-hensive restoration program.

This appeal to humans is. The food habits and nesting success of Wood Storks in Everglades National Park U.S. National Park Service Report no. 16, Washington, DC. Wood stork productivity Final performance report. Feeding Habits. Small fish from 1 to 6 inches long, especially topminnows and sunfish, provide this bird's primary diet.

Wood storks capture their prey by a specialized technique known as grope-feeding or tacto-location. Feeding often occurs in water 6 to 10 inches deep, where a stork probes with the bill partly open.

The food habits and nesting success of Wood Storks in Everglades National Park Natural Resources Report Num U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Washington D.C. Google ScholarCited by: 2. TEMPORAL VARIATION IN LOCAL WETLAND HYDROLOGY INFLUENCES POSTDISPERSAL SURVIVAL OF JUVENILE WOOD STORKS (MYCTERIA AMERICANA)RENA R.

BORKHATARIA,1,5 PETER C. FREDERICK,2 REBECCA A. KELLER,3 AND JAIME A. COLLAZO4 1University of Florida, Everglades Research and Education Center, E. Palm. FEEDING HABITS:  Small fish from 1 to 6 inches long, especially topminnows and sunfish, provide this bird's primary diet.

Wood storks capture their prey by a specialized technique known as grope-feeding or tacto-location. Feeding often occurs in water 6 to 10 inches deep, where a stork probes with the bill partly open.

Though wood storks eat small fish, they eat a lot of them. An average nesting pair, with two fledglings, may eat over pounds of fish during a single breeding season. Wood storks. Wood Storks primarily eat fish and other aquatic invertebrates, but sometimes take seeds, amphibians, nestlings, and reptiles.

They walk slowly through wetlands with their bill in the water, feeling for prey. When they feel something on their bill, they quickly snap it.

Stork diet includes many species of small fish, crabs, crayfish, snakes, frogs, young alligators, rodents, and occasionally the young of other bird species. Wood Storks typically wade with their open bills in shallow water, snapping them shut very quickly at the slightest touch of food matter.

Detail of “Wood Storks at Paurotis Pond.”. Dietary habits of the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, in Everglades National Park, Florida Article in Herpetological Bulletin () September with Reads. American wood stork taken off endangered list. but destruction of wetlands in the Everglades and elsewhere to make way for development decimated their numbers from an estima breeding.

The food habits and nesting success of wood storks in Everglades National Park U.S.D.I. National Park Service, National Research Repirt No.

25 pp. Ogden, J. Records from to indicate that Wood Storks usually initiated nesting at the latest in December (Ogden, ).Fig. 3 illustrates month of Wood Stork nest initiation from until present, although 10 years are missing from the data sequence (,–, –).

The date of nest initiation may have become slightly earlier over the past Cited by: Florida’s Wood Storks Population Decline _____ The wood stork (Mycteria americana) is an impressive wading bird that can be easily recognized by its large size, stout curved bill and white plumage trimmed in black.

Worldwide, there are 17 species of storks but only the wood stork is regularly found in the United Size: 45KB. Scientists and ecologists cite wetland drainage for this massive reduction in population, as wood storks forage for fish and other food sources in the waters of the Everglades.

As each nest requires about pounds of fish to ensure health and survival, it is no wonder--and unfortunate--that so many mating couples have been forced to abandon. Wood Stork (Mycteria americana) foraging flight studies at 20 colonies throughout the US range were reviewed to summarize foraging ranges and compared to 20, 25 and 30 km-wide regulatory buffers (“core foraging areas”) created to provide sufficient foraging habitats for breeding storks.

Mean (per colony) direct distances to foraging sites ranged from to km, and between Cited by: 6. The Food Habits and Nesting Success of Wood Storks in the Everglades National Park,FI; Olmsted, Ingrid C., Loope, Lloyd L., & Rintz, Richard E., Report T, A Survey and Baseline Analysis of Aspects of the Vegetation of Taylor Slough, Everglades National Park, FI   Ecologists hopeful after strong year for Everglades wading birds.

Thousands of great egrets, white ibis, wood storks and other wading birds started to rebound in from a string of bad nesting. The Food Habits and Nesting Success of Wood Storks in Everglades National Park in Natural Resources Report Natural Resources Report U.S. National Park Service, Washington, by:   Corkscrew Swamp was once the biggest nesting ground for North America’s Wood Storks.

In the past 60 years, close tobaby storks were born in the sanctuary’s moss-drenched cypress forest. Today, the Audubon preserve, located in Naples, Florida, is lucky to get a fleeting visit from a hundred of the bald-headed birds. Wilson Bull., 98(3),pp.

THE HISTORY OF THE SOUTHERN FLORIDA WOOD STORK POPULATION JAMES A. KUSHLAN AND PAULA C. FROHRING’ AswnAcr.-The largest segment of the North American Wood Stork (Mycteria ameri- cam) population traditionally nested in southern Florida, where its perceived decrease over the last 50 years resulted in its addition File Size: 1MB.Statement of the Issue The U.S.

population of the wood stork (Mycteria americana) has declined by more than 50% since the s and up to 75% in south Florida due to loss of wetland habitat and extensive alteration of the natural hydrological regime of the Everglades ecosystem (OgdenKushlan and FrohringUSFWS ).The decline in the south Florida stork .Vegetation Map of Taylor Slough, Everglades National Park: Richard E.

Rintz and Lloyd L. Loope: N/A: The Food Habits and Nesting Success of Wood Storks in Everglades National Park in John C. Ogden, James A.

Kushlan, and James T. Tilmant: M